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Search Results 200 to 249 of about 278 (some duplicates have been removed)
, fred. >> all right, gentlemen, this young man, a junior in pennsylvania has filed this civil rights suit because he says he was the one who was violated. a sexual encounter he had with somebody on a ten-day field trip was videotaped. the school ended up suspending him for "inappropriate behavior." so regard, how will he go about saying he was the one who should not be disciplined, but the ones who carried out the videotape. >> this someone was his girlfriend of two years, the last week or day of their trip, they had resolutions, which were surreptitiously recorded by somebody, shades of tyler clemente in rutgers, the student says please help me, do something here. and they do. they suspend him and his girlfriend and the video maker, who has charges pending in juvenile court. in any event, the school district did not step back for a minute, they didn't appreciate or act on what happened here. they acted insanely, and some moron suspended him and his girlfriend. they will pay the price for this one, fred, trust me, this case will end quickly in a confidential settlement. the school wa
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
days from election day. can you believe that? and the justice department announced just today its civil rights division will send 780 federal observers to monitor polling places. it's sending personnel to 51 jurisdictions in 23 states including six battleground states. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns on the case for us from washington now. joe, i would ask you why they're doing this, is this something new? i know why they're doing it, but is it new? >> it's not new quite frankly, don. they've done this before. but when you think about it go over the numbers one more time. government is going to essentially 780 observers or justice department personnel, 51 jurisdictions, 23 states, six battleground states, what we found so interesting is the number of people they're sending to individual states. florida's number one on the list. government sending observers to a total of seven different counties in the sunshine state. state of pennsylvania is the runner-up with five different counties followed by ohio and texas each with four locations. and maricopa county, arizona, home
in portchester in december. >> okay. >> and very proud of that. they were very involved in the civil rights movement and they made me politically aware back then in the 1960s, and we're bringing back the four original members of the rascals. >> oh, great. >> good to talk to you, again. we failed to mention, we had talked before earlier in the show, so really appreciate it. we hope you get your power back and then everything works out for you and your family and your friends, and obviously we'll be supporting the money that you're going to be raising for awareness and to help those folks that are out there in the region. >> thank you. thank you, cnn, for supporting this very, very worthwhile cause. >> thank you, steven. appreciate it. >> here's what we're working on for this hour. >> just five days until the election. will it come down to ohio? plus this. >> manhattan, partially paralyzed after superstorm sandy flooded parts of the city. the fight for taxis, buses, and subway rides as people start returning to work. in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought r
form of tax increase. we should lead by setting a high example for civil liberties and civil rights and due process and rule of law which is why we should close guantanamo and restore habeas corpus. i know he'll be able to help me turn the page on the ugly partisanship in washington so we can bring democrats and republicans together to pass an agenda that works for the american people. jon: well, that was then-senator barack obama promising big change during his 2008 successful presidential campaign. those promises you just heard pretty much went unfulfilled over the past four years including his vow to work with the other side of the aisle. our next guest says if president obama had lived up to his promises, things would look very different right now. fred barnes writing in "the weekly standard," quote: if he had done in his first term what he now vows to accomplish in his second term, he'd be this a far stronger position to win re-election next tuesday. he might have been a shoo-in. fred, you know, people have short memories when it comes to re-election time. take us back to four
equality. question 6 strengthens protections for our churches and guarantees the civil right to commit to the one you love. while there are those trying to divide us, presidents obama and clinton stand with us. pastors, business leaders, newspapers, democrats and republicans are all coming together for question 6. because it's about fairness-- treating everyone equal under the law. and who could be against that? (bell ringshi. yes? you know those delicious granola bunches in honey bunches of oats? i love those. we've added more to every box. really? wow! honey bunches of oats. make your day bunches better. would ban all abortions and contraception seemed a bit extreme. so i looked into it. turns out, romney doesn't oppose contraception at all. in fact, he thinks abortion should be an option in cases of rape, incest, or to save a mother's life. this issue's important to me, but i'm more concerned about the debt our children will be left with. i voted for president obama last time, but we just can't afford four more years. [ romney ] i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. >>> i love
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
, update on the west portal fire, update on the civil grand jury report on the arts commission, and make announcements regarding small business activities. >> all right, commissioners. so, before you is my director's report. it's been a very busy month. so, at our last meeting, which was i believe october 1st, on october 2nd scott halgey convened a meeting with small business leaders with the mayor. and while i will speak to some of the items, president adams in his president's report who was in attendance is going to speak -- elaborate on it more. i just want to let you know that our role for our office is, one, whenever the mayor convenes a meeting, he always has staff there who he needs to have on hand. -- as it pertains to who he's meeting with. but also second, we also presented on the online business portal and had the discussion and the mayor is very supportive of this. * a we have started to move and progressing towards this with the mayor's office of chief innovation taking on some leadership and create and working to create the online business portal. so, i just want to let you
of the area of impact? >> right now we're counting on our law enforcement officials and civil defense to enact the evacuation. people are evacuating. roads are somewhat congested but we're hoping people continue to cooperate with our law enforcement officials. >> those roads that are congested, are they a safe distance from the beach that people of trying to get out right now if. >> they're our main thoroughfares. we didn't have as much lead time as we have had in previous tsunami warnings. they're under the cover of night. so they may have slowed down evacuation somewhat. >> could you be in a situation where this tsunami less than 30 minutes away could come onshore and there are still significant cars on the road? >> we are hoping that the word has gotten out enough that folks closest to the roads, closest to the evacuation zones, are already out of the evacuation zones. if not, we're counting on our law enforcement officials and local self-defense -- >> the problem is some people that didn't need to evacuate are evacuating. so perhaps you're seeing more people on the roads trying to get to h
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
said at the beginning is right which is books are civilization. and i'm much more worried about sglifl civilization's survival than an industry's survival. so maintaining and spreading these all important, i think, habits of these conversation, thee intimate conversations is worries me more than what will happen to my books or to the publishers. >> one of the issues with printing is that there really is a step function in the cost of printing. you know. you print smaller quantities. it becomes more expensive. now it's certainly true that you can go print on demand. for example 80% of my company's books are now print on demand. even when we are printing 10,000 copies. you know, we're working with ingram and have done a fantastic job of building an infrastructure that let us us do whatever quantity we want. and it's integrated with a digital tool chain that allows us literally to publish a book to an ebook in five or six different formats. push it out into a digital tool. so digital distribution chain, you know, immediately so we have this new kind of logistics of book publishing which i
of reality, i think african-americans and most people in modern civilization have a long ways to go before they perceive reality in the right way that will permit them to have the kind of brotherhood that we all hope for in these great religions of christianity, judaism, islam, etc. before we can have that real brotherhood, that feeling of love for my fellow human being, i think we have to grow up and mature a lot when it comes to perceiving the realities that we think we know already, you know. i'm talking about our nation. the way i perceive our nation, i think, is very healthy for me, and i wish all african-americans could perceive this america the way i perceive it, but they don't. and the many white americans that i have become acquainted with perceive this nation as not the way that i think would give me a good life and my children a good life if i passed those feelings on to my children. so american people, in my opinion- and not only the way we perceive america, the way we look at human beings, too, human life and everything, i think we are a society of people that are far advanced
insider rights this a -- guest: the civil union issue, i think that is accurate, by the way. i have not see the civil union issue pop up in to the contras as of the average voter. on the margins, -- into the consciousness of the average voter. on the margins, it may pop up. although, it would traditionally break into the democratic party since they have been the sponsor of this type of legislation in the legislature. the predominant issue around the country is the economy. host: the bloomberg insider also reports -- guest: can we do a better job, absolutely. and we must do a better job for one to remain a relevant party on the national scene, and particularly in the west. the latino vote, the hispanic vote as we like to call that in the west, it had shifted toward the republicans under president and former colorado gov. bill once actually won the hispanic vote here in 2002. it began to slip away. we had some issues with one of our congressman, congressman tom tancredo pushed away some of those votes. of the active voting provision is about 16%. the -- the acting voting population is
the first railroads were build in new york state, the first rail line was laid right parallel to the canal, and later, the first interstate west through new york was laid right next to the railroad, and it was not until really after the civil war that the amount of freight carried by railroads exceeded the amount of freight carried by the erie canal and other canals. >> i've got a follow-up question to that actually, you know, are there any bits of the erie canal operational today for commerce rather than historical republicans? >> right. , i think i mentioned this is the third version. the first was four feet deep, enlargement from the 1830s to the 60s, and then from 1905-1917, the current canal built, a canal for motorized barges. the current canal is essentially much straighter, much, much broader than the original canal, and there is -- i've basketball on the canal, and there's now -- i've been on the canal, and there's not for several decades, no commercial activity. it's entirely pleasure boaters, and there was a brief resurgence in the summer when gas went up to -- when oil prices s
because they've been right at "the new york times" jobs to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. that got me thinking, whose job is at? if it's not going to be the times they are going to shut up private plans, at least sort of a vacuum. i would've thought responsible government would leave that felt by the government as opposed to by law professors and centers for national security. so as i said at the beginning, i do agree with john at the debate is not in any significant regard difference in so far as the tensions from what has been really for the better part of the last seven years. i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability and at least uncomfortable with. and maybe that's just because i'm a law professor who happens to spend time in the trenches like these guys. >> i think it's a little uncomfortable to talk about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has been occurred. the question has been life to the ngos, the think tanks, the press committees are to figure out who exactly is responsib
, departments, and to the public. the city email conversion project. i know that the civil grand jury points that as a failure or a ongoing frustration. i think we see some of the recent success and progress we're optimistic. right now 3600 users, 27 departments and some of the largest departments are slated for conversion in the next months and library is slated for conversion and additional 1300 accounts and others in january. our largest department with another 7100 accounts. data center consolidation and virtualization has been so successful that the scope has been expanded. initially the project was to convert or relocate 900 servers and 750 have been virtualized and 400 identified as candidates and 300 additional for relocation and total of 1400 servers, much larger than the originally scope of the project. this is also a sign of collaboration among the departments and one of the data center is housed at the airport and not in our department of technology. enterprise agreements have recently been completed with bm ware and adobe and projected to save the city money over the next
protect you and me from those who would do us harm, threaten our rights and take away our civil liberties whether they be foreign or domestic, unscrupulous businesses, corporations or individuals. i gained a reputation as a legislator committed to working together. i worked with governor mike leavitt to balance the state budget every single year. collaboration is how problems are solved. as your united states senator, i promise you every day i'll work the represent you -- to represent you and this great state. god bless you. god bless utah, and thank you very much. >> moderator: on behalf of the studio audience, our viewing audience and the citizens of utah, we thank you both for running. [applause] >> that debate between candidates to represent utah in the u.s. senate happened on october 17th. it's one of the dozens of debates we've been bringing you this election season. follow campaign 2012 live on the c-span television networks, c-span radio and c-span.org. you can also find us on twitter and facebook, and we've also been taking a look at some of the swing states in play this election
but i do believe everyone is entitled to rights and that's why i support civil unions. >> moderator: next question to the kingman. >> this keep in via e-mail. how would you restructure the taxes? >> i talked about the need to make our code more simple and fair. we have way to many loopholes taken advantage of because it's school in they have lawyers that find these loopholes. that doesn't mean it's right. even if it's legal, we should change that because it's not helping create jobs. every day i meet with small business owners, and those guys, a lot of them just -- they come fresh from their work. they have oil on them and grease, and they can't afford to hire a whole wing of lawyers to find these loopholes? that's an example. and by the way, jets and oil companies and loopholes that allow companies to write off moving jobs overseas, those are primed to be closed. that helps our small businesses. we can lower rates for our guys and gals and hard-working families. so what i'm for is making sure we execute this process. i have voted to stepped -- extend out the current rates for a yea
bay, civil liberties, there is something that animated the hatred on the left. for the right, it wasn't specifically foreign policy and civil liberties. we have a president is that is not only largely continuing the same foreign policy as its predecessor, but expanding it in ways that the left would not accept. when bush was there, the patriot act, to put people away without due process. obama has said we can imprison american citizens. not just enemy combatants, but citizens. never any questions asked. how do you see with obama now doing bush on things with the continuation of undeclared wars, how do you see foreign policy from a liberal perspective considering that obama has considered so many of his predecessors policies and expand on them. >> obama himself has not interpreted it as saying that we have the right to be maki said that we have the power, but i won't do it. >> i don't think that's quite accurate. it's a very vague sentence in the bill, it said any more power that is specifically about foreign terrorists, that they have the right to take american citizens willy-nilly in
wrote, it's not "the new york times"' job to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. and that got me thinking, well, then whose job is it? you know, if it's not going to be the times, and if you're going to shut out private plaintiffs from pursuing this information, i don't know, you know, that leaves a sort of a vacuum. and i would have thought that responsible government would believe that the vacuum should be filled by the government, right? as opposed to by law professors and, you know, senators or national security. i do, as i said in the beginning, i do agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different, um, insofar as the tensions, um, from what it's been really for the better part of the post-world war -- the better part of the last 70 years. but i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability than at least i'm comfortable with, um, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, law professor who hasn't spent time in the trenches like these guys. >> you know, i think it's a little uncomfortable to
on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understand that there are, that since the brains are very different, they
a criminal law and civil law background. he was confident. he had the right work ethic. everything about it was a perfect fit for us. remember, if you have a civil law firm with a contingency fee incentive in a case like that involving a state, you miss issues that are important to the state of alabama. one issue in the bp case, which is critical to state, is that the judge's decision to apply federal maritime law to the penalties that would apply if they recovered as opposed to state penalties. alabama has significant state penalties for these events. the judge decided to go with the federal statute. that's on appeal in the 5th circuit because we feel like in criminal law terms if they manufacture poisen in atlanta, sends it to birmingham to poisen someone, the state has jurisdiction over that. that's a simple analogy, but that's the state criminal law state authority power issue that's at stake in this litigation, and an in-house lawyer who understands that is particularly important in cases like that. the other thing that doug mentioned, and the question was where do you get your info
culpable. remember the civil stuff he saw in arizona. is that civil? for those of you keeping score, there is certainly craziness on the right. we all know that the far right did not have much clout in tamp, hardly any at the republic convention. there is a vast difference in presentation between the g.o.p. and the dems. the election referendum on barack obama. do you want his liberal governance or not? if you do want it, then you have to accept the far left loons that come along with it. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight. how is the vote shaping one six days to go. joining us now from austin, texas. fox news analyst carl rove. mr. rove, new "new york times" poll out today shows president obama doing very well in florida, ohio, virginia. dick morris going to have thoughts on that later. but, do you take that poll seriously? >> no, i don't take those three polls seriously. here is why. in florida, they have obama ahead by 1 point. they have seven points more democrats than republicans. even in 2008 there were only 3 points more democrats than republicans. similarly ohio
urges revenge against mitt romney. what happened to civility? we'll be right back. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >> gretchen: welcome back everyone. the presidential election just three days away now. can you imagine that both candidates are going from town to town to town to town in those swing states. what are they saying? remember when president obama talked a lot about civility and how we should all be nice to each other and not really say any words that might be negative. >> steve: how is that working out? >> gretchen: yesterday he used a word that was new to his stump speech. he got boos from the audience when he talked about mitt romney but then he said this. >> at the time the republic congress any senate candidate by the name of mitt rom? i. [boos] >> no, no, no. don't
hope you are right. thank you, sir for joining us live on this saturday morning. >> thanks for having me. >> brian: four minutes until the bottom of the hour. so much for civility on the campaign trail eastward either side. revenge on mitt romney? what revenge? i thought this was their first match. >> steve: she tried to sneak a fast ones at the polls but wound up walking out in handcuffs. what did she do? we got details. >> brian: that hair color looks so natural. ♪ there she goes again. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy withtep-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating fr
Search Results 200 to 249 of about 278 (some duplicates have been removed)